logo

Your Life. Your Health. Take Control.®

1-800-442-3438

One in Two Adults

Posted on 12/19/2013

One in two adults in the U.S. take a daily vitamin, spending tens of billions of dollars a year on supplements. The most popular products are multivitamin and mineral supplements, which are taken by 40 percent of men and women in our country. It is a $30 billion dollar business.

It has been my long-standing medical and personal opinion that most people, unless they have a specific medical condition and are directed by their doctor, do not need to waste their money on supplements. It is much better and more effective to receive vital nutrients and vitamins from whole food and not in a pill. Period. 

Even back in 1985 when I started Seattle Sutton’s Healthy Eating, I was adamant about not recommending vitamins and supplements in place of a healthy, balanced diet. 

Now, an opinion editorial in the Annals of Internal Medicine, authored by five physicians, states that for the average healthy adult consuming vitamins to prevent chronic disease there is no clear benefit to taking vitamins and mineral pills. In fact, they state, in some cases, they may cause even more harm than good. 

Please readers, listen up, science has spoken yet again. I can’t tell you how many times in recent years, new studies tout the ineffectiveness of vitamins and supplements. And, also how dangerous they can be and are for many people. 

The editorial in the journal this week stated simply, “The message is simple. Most supplements do not prevent chronic disease or death, their use is not justified, and they should be avoided.” 

A senior editor for the medical journal said, “that there’s so much information from so many studies that we don’t need a lot more evidence to put this to bed.” 

The op-ed in the Annals of Internal Medicine was accompanied by two new studies reporting dismal results for multivitamins in helping to preserve cognitive function and prevent heart attacks. In one of the studies of nearly 6,000 male physicians aged 65-plus, participants who took a multivitamin for more than a decade were no more likely than their counterparts who took a placebo pill did not retain cognitive function. 

There you have it, dear readers, not one but three more examples of why vitamins and supplements are typically a waste of your time and precious money. Why make this $30 billion industry richer and continue to grow? Keep the money in your pocket and spend it on healthy food instead. 

Remember, your greatest asset in life is your health. So, take care of it!

post-author

Seattle Sutton, BSN, RN

She made healthy eating her mission in life long before anyone else did, in hopes of helping her own obese father. A registered nurse by training and entrepreneur at heart, she lives, eats and breathes everything about healthy eating and helping to improve people’s eating habits and overall health. She enjoys never having to bother with grocery shopping, cooking and counting calories. Her favorite SSHE meal, although it’s hard to pick just one, is the Potato Gnocchi with Basil Pesto Sauce.

Post a Comment